Candlelight Vigil held on campus to remember Las Vegas Shooting Victims

 

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 A candlelight vigil was held on The Quad to honor the victims of the Las Vegas shooting. Dr. Edward Brown also spoke on the importance of reaching out to our government and using our voices as Americans to help stop these tragedies from happening again.

Landau Eugene Murphy Returns to Keyser

 

The lights dim as the audience sits quietly in anticipation. The band swiftly rushes to their seats to prepare their instruments. Suddenly, the saxophone starts to play as Landau Eugene Murphy Jr. energetically takes the stage to do what he loves.

On Saturday, Sept. 30, Murphy returned to Potomac State College for a third year to sing for the students and citizens of Keyser. As a native of Logan, West Virginia Murphy rose to fame after winning the sixth season of “America’s Got Talent.”  After his big win, Murphy secured a one-year contract to headline at Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas.

Murphy kicked off the concert with his rendition of Frank Sinatra’s “Come Fly With Me.” The audience couldn’t stay in their seats as he sang other jazz classics. Murphy was very good at interacting with the audience. He was always quick with a joke between each of his songs.

Murphy ensured that each member of his band was given credit throughout the concert. He even gave them time to perform solos.

Murphy was joined on stage by the music group LCB (Leonard, Coleman and Blunt.) The band consists of Glenn Leonard (former singer for The Temptations,) Joe Coleman (former lead singer for The Platters) and Joe Blunt (former lead singer for The Drifters.)   The members of LCB are lifelong friends who decided to put together their band after retiring from their respective former groups. The musical trio performed many Motown classics.

“The show was really good. It’s not the type of music I’d normally listen to, but I think I might give it a try,” said PSC student Joshua Rubin.

Students Assist in Fort Ashby Archaeology Dig

By Matt Timbrook

Summer months were spent digging up the past and preserving history

Paul Meyers, Dave Frederick (top) and PSC Student Matthew Timbrook participate in the archaeological dig in Fort Ashby over the summer. Photo by Dr. Stephen McBride

Tucked away in Fort Ashby are the remains of the town’s namesake, a rudimentary fort commissioned by Col. Washington to fend off Native American raids in the midst of the French and Indian War.

Although the site of the historic landmark now resembles more of a vacant grassy field than a military installation, below the surface lies a plethora of clues, artifacts and insight into the history of John Ashby’s Fort.

Potomac State College assisted in excavating the site under the guidance of Dr. Stephen McBride, an archaeologist who is both knowledgeable and experienced in the realm of 18th century American history.

The course was both instructional and functional as McBride taught the class the painstakingly precise and calculated methods of measuring, roping off and eventually carving into zones of soil.

The students used a variety of tools including shovels, trowels, brushes, and perhaps the most important equipment of all: their eyes.

The ability to notice very subtle changes in soil color and texture made all the difference as the class meticulously scraped away layers of earth in search of the A-Horizon — the soil that would have been on the surface in the 1700s before layers of sediment accumulated over it.

Throughout those hot summer weeks of June and July, the students managed to uncover a multitude of 18th and 19th century artifacts including musket balls, wrought iron nails, and even buttons from the uniforms of the fort’s garrison.

Students also chased the footprint of darkened soil that marked the precise location of the stockades and bastions that protected the fort’s inhabitants.

The precise mapping of the structure’s original footprint is a monumental achievement; future efforts to preserve Fort Ashby’s historic heritage have yet to be announced.

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Potomac State College Runner Smashes Record

emily pylesEmily Pyles plans to beat the 5k record next.

by Staff and Christopher Hackney

Potomac State College runner Emily Pyles beat the previous women’s 6K time by nearly five minutes at the Frostburg race at Maplehurst.

  The WVU-PSC Catamount cross country team is looking to continue rolling through the 2017 slate after finishing third and seventh in the Barbour County Skirmish and the Westmoreland CCC Invitational respectively, although they had failed to place in the Shenandoah University Invitational. At press time, the team is headed to the Hood College Invitational.

  The Catamount cross country team consists of an all-freshman team of Kole Bennett of McHenry, Maryland, Joshua Kincaid of Parsons, West Virginia and Shane Yutzy of Meyersdale, Pennsylvania. The Catamounts are led by first-year head coach Kurtis Wildman. 

Student Mixes Original Music

Snapchat-1870740327Seth O’Neill making his own music. Photo Provided by: Seth O’Neill

Potomac State College student Seth O’Neill has been mixing his own music in his free time. He mainly creates Downtempo, Low Fidelity and Trip-Hop music. O’Neill tries to make mellow sounds for all of his followers to enjoy.

“Mixing music involves a lot of repeatedly listening to the same thing over and over trying to get it right. Adjusting to the frequencies, volumes and adding distortions to a sound to get it right,” said O’Neill.

O’Neill started working on music when he was in middle school. He was introduced to Soundation, a website that allows users access to free loops. A loop is a beat that continuously repeats.

O’Neill draws a lot of his inspiration from listening to bands such as Gorrilaz, Daft Punk and Deadmau5.   

  Although he was really into mixing music, O’Neill failed to master any musical concepts until this year.

At the beginning of the year, he was able to break through the learning curve and attract some attention to his music.

“In September, I was interviewed for the first time on Free Music Archive. It is a website that is all about posting curated artist’s songs for free creative commons use in any media, which was cool. I never expected to attract this much attention to be interviewed in such a short amount of time,” said O’Neill.

You can also check out his music at his Bandcamp: https://sromuchsound.bandcamp.com/or his SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/s-r-o

His music is also posted on other commercial platforms. You would be able to find his songs on iTunes, Spotify and Google Play.

O’Neill would like to make music professionally if his career takes off. O’Neill believes that a job in the marketing field might be a good use of the skills he has learned.

Wherever O’Neill may end up in the future, he knows that he will still have a blast mixing his own music.

OUTSTANDING STUDENT

2017 Outstanding Student Ali Barrett w Orlikoff

Ali Barrett receiving the Outstanding Student Award by President Orlikoff. Photo by PSC Communications

Ali Barrett was named the 2017 Outstanding Student of the Year at the annual Scholars’ Wall and Recognition Day Ceremony.

The nominees for the prestigious E. William Noland Outstanding Student Award were Samuel Aloi, Samantha Hesse, Breanna Nestor, Nickolas Imes, Ali Barrett, Sarah Whiteman and Hannah Dickson.

Barrett, Dickson and Whiteman were chosen by a faculty committee to be honored on the Scholar’s Wall after reviewing their resumes and conducting an interview with each individual.

All three will share in the achievement of having their names engraved on the Duke Anthony Whitmore and Henry Louis Gates Jr. Academic Achievement Wall (Scholars’ Wall).

The wall was planned to honor Henry Louis Gates Jr., Ph.D., who attended PSC and now serves as chair of Harvard’s Department of African American Studies.

Gates planned to become a physician while attending PSC. His teacher, Tony “Duke” Whitmore, changed his life by introducing the world of language and literature to Gates.

Whitmore died before the wall could be complete, so Gates honored him by adding his professor’s name beside his for the wall.

The committee also chooses a former faculty member to be honored. Kenneth F. Haines was honored this year. He dedicated 44 years of service at PSC, teaching foreign languages.

R. Ivan Pinnell, class of 1963, was chosen as the Alumni Honoree. He earned his associate degree in journalism from PSC in 1963. As a student he served as a reporter and was a member editorial board for the “Pasquino”.

REAL-WORLD EXPERIENCE

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Potomac State College students are getting ahead in their careers by completing internships and engaging in real-world work experience.

Dalton Minnigh, marketing sophomore, is interning through the Allegany County Historical Society. Minnigh writes press releases, creates flyers and plans events held at the Gordon-Roberts House in Cumberland, Maryland.

“This experience has given me so much already by showing me that I have to remain organized, focused, take initiative when necessary and not be afraid to brainstorm new ideas,” Minnigh said.

Candi Fitzwater is a fourth-year business student. To help complete her major, she is a teaching assistant for Mr. Stone to earn credit in an upper division elective. Fitzwater helps grade tests, makes copies, takes notes and goes over homework problems with the class.

“Being a TA has shown me that everyone learns differently and at a different speed; you have to try different methods so everyone can understand,” Fitzwater said.

Kyley Foster, elementary education sophomore, has completed the 60 internship hours to get into Education 200. She also spent three weeks with a fifth grade class and another six months with kindergarten at Keyser Primary School. Foster worked one-on-one with students, helped grade papers, answered questions and taught brief lessons. These internships have helped Foster decide that teaching is the right path for her.

“I definitely think internships are an excellent way to help with a career,” Foster said.

Cody Brazil is a freshman journalism major and hopes to either be an investigative reporter or a public relations representative.

Brazil was able to learn about different strategies and techniques in the classroom, but it wasn’t until he landed a job at Keyser’s newspaper, “The Mineral Daily News-Tribune,” that he realized the importance of applying these skills.

Brazil wanted to appear professional, so he did not check the spelling of names on his first story. When he turned in his article, someone’s name had been misspelled. “Luckily, it happened at a small job I do on the side for the experience. An opportunity that I feel everyone should be able to have. I implore you all to go out and find opportunities to make mistakes,” Brazil said.

Alyssa Murray is also a freshman journalism major and hopes to become a photojournalist. The biggest lesson she learned while working for the Keyser paper was the importance of deadlines.

“If you work really hard on a story, but you turn it in late, it doesn’t matter. Your work won’t be seen because they won’t run it,” Murray said.

Amber Butcher, journalism professor, encourages her students to complete two to four internships before graduating.