REAL-WORLD EXPERIENCE

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Potomac State College students are getting ahead in their careers by completing internships and engaging in real-world work experience.

Dalton Minnigh, marketing sophomore, is interning through the Allegany County Historical Society. Minnigh writes press releases, creates flyers and plans events held at the Gordon-Roberts House in Cumberland, Maryland.

“This experience has given me so much already by showing me that I have to remain organized, focused, take initiative when necessary and not be afraid to brainstorm new ideas,” Minnigh said.

Candi Fitzwater is a fourth-year business student. To help complete her major, she is a teaching assistant for Mr. Stone to earn credit in an upper division elective. Fitzwater helps grade tests, makes copies, takes notes and goes over homework problems with the class.

“Being a TA has shown me that everyone learns differently and at a different speed; you have to try different methods so everyone can understand,” Fitzwater said.

Kyley Foster, elementary education sophomore, has completed the 60 internship hours to get into Education 200. She also spent three weeks with a fifth grade class and another six months with kindergarten at Keyser Primary School. Foster worked one-on-one with students, helped grade papers, answered questions and taught brief lessons. These internships have helped Foster decide that teaching is the right path for her.

“I definitely think internships are an excellent way to help with a career,” Foster said.

Cody Brazil is a freshman journalism major and hopes to either be an investigative reporter or a public relations representative.

Brazil was able to learn about different strategies and techniques in the classroom, but it wasn’t until he landed a job at Keyser’s newspaper, “The Mineral Daily News-Tribune,” that he realized the importance of applying these skills.

Brazil wanted to appear professional, so he did not check the spelling of names on his first story. When he turned in his article, someone’s name had been misspelled. “Luckily, it happened at a small job I do on the side for the experience. An opportunity that I feel everyone should be able to have. I implore you all to go out and find opportunities to make mistakes,” Brazil said.

Alyssa Murray is also a freshman journalism major and hopes to become a photojournalist. The biggest lesson she learned while working for the Keyser paper was the importance of deadlines.

“If you work really hard on a story, but you turn it in late, it doesn’t matter. Your work won’t be seen because they won’t run it,” Murray said.

Amber Butcher, journalism professor, encourages her students to complete two to four internships before graduating.